Baha’i Writings

 

1.     Spiritual / Relational

 

1.3                  Women & Men (Equality and Roles)

 

1.3.1                  Women & Men - The cause of happiness of mankind
           
The happiness of mankind will be realized when women and men coordinate and advance equally, for each is the complement and helpmeet of the other.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 182)

 

 

1.3.2                   Women & Men – The vegetable and animal kingdoms

            In the vegetable kingdom there is complete equality between male and female of species. Likewise, in the animal plane equality exists; all are under the protection of God.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 182)

 

 

1.3.3                   Women & Men - Women’s progress

            Woman's lack of progress and proficiency has been due to her need of equal education and opportunity. Had she been allowed this equality, there is no doubt she would be the counterpart of man in ability and capacity.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 182)

 

 

1.3.4                   Women & Men - Women’s education

… there must be an equality of rights between men and women. Women shall receive an equal privilege of education. This will enable them to qualify and progress in all degrees of occupation and accomplishment. For the world of humanity possesses two wings: man and woman. If one wing remains incapable and defective, it will restrict the power of the other, and full flight will be impossible. Therefore, the completeness and perfection of the human world are dependent upon the equal development of these two wings.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 318)

 

 

1.3.5                   Women & Men – The progress of women

Devote ye particular attention to the school for girls, for the greatness of this wondrous Age will be manifested as a result of progress in the world of women.

 

            (Compilations, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 377)

 

 

1.3.6                   Women & Men – The importance of the education of women

Work ye for the guidance of the women in that land, teach the young girls and the children, so that the mothers may educate their little ones from their earliest days, thoroughly train them, rear them to have a goodly character and good morals, guide them to all the virtues of humankind, prevent the development of any behaviour that would be worthy of blame, and foster them in the embrace of Baha'i education.
 

                                   
`Abdu'l-Baha:  Selections ...  `Abdu'l-Baha      Pages 124-125

 

 

1.3.7                   Women & Men – The participation of women in society

Again, it is well established in history that where woman has not participated in human affairs the outcomes have never attained a state of completion and perfection. On the other hand, every influential undertaking of the human world wherein woman has been a participant has attained importance. This is historically true and beyond disproof even in religion.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 133)

 

 

1.3.8                   Women & Men – The education of women and men

Furthermore, the education of woman is more necessary and important than that of man, for woman is the trainer of the child from its infancy. If she be defective and imperfect herself, the child will necessarily be deficient; therefore, imperfection of woman implies a condition of imperfection in all mankind, for it is the mother who rears, nurtures and guides the growth of the child. This is not the function of the father. If the educator be incompetent, the educated will be correspondingly lacking. This is evident and incontrovertible. Could the student be brilliant and accomplished if the teacher is illiterate and ignorant? The mothers are the first educators of mankind; if they be imperfect, alas for the condition and future of the race.

 

            (Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 133)